Healthy & Happy  

Hydration and Weight Loss

The New York Post reports that more than 70% of U.S. adults don’t drink enough water. While the daily intake of water will vary from one person to the next, we recommend that you should be drinking at least half of your body weight in ounces per day. Proper hydration does more than just quench your thirst, it has weight loss benefits, too.

Water Acts as an Appetite Suppressant

When your body is hungry, it’s easy to feed it with whatever food is convenient, from unhealthy snacks to sugary sweets. However, when you drink water, your stomach becomes fuller, naturally, and without the excess calories. In fact, a 2013 health study by the National Library of Medicine found that overweight individuals who consume water before meals are more likely to lose weight, than those who don’t.

Water Acts as a Substitute for Other Liquids

Sugary juices, calorie-filled sodas, and coffee sweeteners are all examples of calorie-dense liquids. (These liquids are also not permitted under the RM3® plan, for good reason!) Water is a great substitute for these liquids because it has zero calories and many health benefits. For example, drinking three soda cans in a day that are 150 calories each, will result in a whopping 450 calories, whereas three glasses of water results in 0 calories by comparison!

Water Hydrates You When You Exercise

When you’re using your muscles for exercise, whether it be taking a walk or doing yoga, you’re using your muscles. If your muscles are dehydrated, you won’t be using them efficiently, and this can lead to cramping and fatigue. Also, if you’re sweating, you need to rehydrate yourself so that you can work out longer and burn more calories.

Water Reduces Stress and Anxiety

Stress eating can be a challenge when trying to lose weight. In a study
by the International Journal of Sports Medicine, researchers found that dehydration increases cortisol production. To alleviate this, drink more water and stay hydrated. When you’re ‘hungry’, you may actually just be ‘thirsty’, and drinking a glass or two of water can help combat those stressful food cravings.

Sometimes we mistake our boredom or thirst for hunger, which is a vital mistake. Even just mild dehydration can trick our bodies into thinking that we’re hungry! Learn more about appetite control strategies.